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Investor(Provisional) Visa Subclass 162

What is Subclass 162 Visa?

This Subclass, one of the subclasses under Business Skills Program, is for investors/business people who have an overall successful record of business or investment activities, have significant net assets, are willing to invest funds in a designated investment in Australia for 4 years and have a genuine commitment to maintain business and investment activity in Australia.

This Subclass 162 was closed to new applicants from 1 July 2012 but remains open for adding secondary/dependent applicants. The Business Skills Program was replaced by the Business Innovation and Investment Program (hyperlink to Subclass 188).

Current holder of Subclass 162 must apply for the ‘pre 1 July 2012’ permanent Business Skills visas (hyperlink to subclass 890, 891 and 892).

 

What is the Application Process?

The following are necessary for the application process of this visa:

+ What is Relationship of the applicant?

Applicant must be a member of the family unit of the main applicant.

+ Adding members to the application

If the application for primary applicant has not yet been decided, other family unit members (including a partner) may still apply separately from the main applicant, provided that the primary application has not yet been decided.

+ Applications from family members of visa holders

Newborn children who are born in Australia to primary visa holder of this subclass are deemed to have the same visa as their parents.

Members of the family unit of primary visa holder of this subclass can join primary visa holder in Australia by submitting subsequent application. The intent is to recognise that the family circumstances of a visa holder may change during the four-year provisional period and to make it easier for babies born overseas and partners.

Subsequent applications from family unit can be evaluated without having to reconsider if all other visa holders in the family unit still meet the primary or secondary criteria.


What We Like About This Visa?

Please Provide More Info

 

Client Testimonials

….we call it Support Network

As navigating through the immigration law process may be difficult, our former clients have agreed to share their experiences through telephone chats, emails and meeting in person.

These are their stories…

 

How Much Do We Charge?

Professional Fees

Sponsorship Application
(a) From $1,000 + GST
(b) From $2,000 + GST
(c) From $3,000 + GST

Nomination Application
(a) From $1,000 + GST
(b) From $2,000 + GST
(c) From $3,000 + GST

Visa Application
(a) From $1,000 + GST
(b) From $2,000 + GST
(c) From $3,000 + GST

Dependent Application
(a) From $1,000 + GST
(b) From $2,000 + GST
(c) From $3,000 + GST

Credit Card Surcharge
- MasterCard: 1.5%
- VISA: 1.67%
- American Express: 2.75%
- EFTPOS: 30 cents

Immigration
Charges

Sponsorship Application
- $420

Nomination Application
- $330

Levy Charges
- $1200 per annum (<$10m)
- $1,600 per annum (>$10m)

Visa Application
- $1,000 (over 18 years)
- $2,000 (under 18 years)
- $700pp (applying in Australia)

Health Check
- $330 (chest x-ray)
- $330 (medical exam)

Credit Card Surcharge
- MasterCard: 1.32%
- VISA: 1.32%
- American Express: 1.40%
- Diners Club: 1.99%
- JCB: 1.40%

Other
Charges

Police Clearance
- $47 (Australia)
- TBA (Outside Australia)

Health Insurance
- TBA

Interpreter & Translator
- TBA

Job Advertisements
- TBA

Other 3rd Party Services
(only if applicable)
- Recognized Prior Learning
- Skills Assessment
- Registration/Membership/Licence
- Labour Market Testing (Unions only)
- Business Plan writers
- Accounting services
- Researchers for salary, LMT, etc







Presenting….
a newer & better
financial expectation

The beautiful part is that if you find that your immigration lawyer does not meet your expectations, you have the option of changing immigration lawyers with different teams, without having to completely change law firms where they’d charge a significant amount as part of the initial fact finding and preliminary advice.

 

Why are there different prices for the same service?

We have a variety of legal professionals, allowing you the freedom to choose according to lawyer’s fees, speed, experience and most importantly a personality that matches yours. This way, our clients get the best of shopping around different law firms while eliminating the need to re-tell the story again and transferring of supporting documents. Naturally, junior lawyers charge lower fees and the more years of experience our lawyers gain, the higher their fees. However, it is not all always about profitting, some of our lawyers are open to pro bono cases (free legal advice).

What are the Legal Personas to Choose From?

Our lawyers are considered “book-smart”, while others are more inclined towards being labelled “street-smart”. The younger lawyers tend to be very fast & responsive, but a handful are slow (although they beg to differ, that slow & steady wins the race). The older lawyers are usually more attentive and have a reputation of customer relations. But if money is no object, you can engage a bunch of them, or all of them.

Similar to the concept of “shopping centers”

…...ALL UNDER 1 ROOF 
shopping around has never been easier


What Questions Do Migration Agents Ask Our Accredited Specialists

  1. Under what business structure, can a job placement company, apply to be a sponsor with the sole purpose of charging a fee to visa applicants? And is there a method which would allow the sponsor to place the visa applicant with another unrelated business?

  2. How can employers charge a payment to the visa applicants in exchange to sponsor, without being caught under the immigration offence ‘cash for visa’?

  3. How many types of visas (including streams), can a Temporary Activities Sponsor benefit from, in sponsoring more candidates? And are there any difference in the sponsorship obligation?

  4. Can a visa applicant pay for costs related to the visa applicant? or must the Sponsor pay for all costs? How do I explain & educate my client, a large company who does not wish to pay for any costs for the sponsorship because the Director feels that the visa applicant has more to benefit than the company.

  5. In what circumstances will a visa applicant lose their right to appeal a refusal?